DG WEAVE

LOCATION: Dal Grauer Substation on Burrard Street, Vancouver
TITLE: DG Weave
DATE: Installed in April 2015
ARTIST: Jessica Eaton
TYPE: Photographic Installation

DG Weave was created in partnership with the Capture Photography Festival. The modernist philosophy with which the building was designed emphasizes the link between art, architecture, and everyday life. With this in mind, Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton was commissioned to create a new site-specific work to be adhered to the Substation’s facade. In it’s conversation with seminal modernist colour theory works, Eaton’s photograph points to the history of the Substation and to Vancouver’s unique role in West Coast modern design. This project highlights this innovative public showcase of future-forward art and technology on Burrard Street. Drawing on the building’s originality, the project emphasizes the building in the streetscape and reassert it as an architectural icon.

The modernist philosophy with which the building was designed emphasizes the link between art, architecture, and everyday life. With this in mind, the Burrard Arts Foundation and Capture Photography Festival has commissioned Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton to create a new site-specific work to be adhered to the Substation’s facade. Eaton’s practice examines the inner workings of analogue cameras’ production of images. While the effects she achieves at first seem the product of Photoshop, her vibrant photographs are the result of several basic manipulations of the photographic process, such as multiple exposures and the use of lens filters. In its conversation with seminal modernist colour theory works, Eaton’s photograph points to the history of the Substation and to Vancouver’s unique role in West Coast modern design.

On the Photographic Work of Jessica Eaton:
Eaton’s signature motif of the geometric cube that she constructs to be photographed is in essence a miniature, grey monochrome. The layers of highly saturated colours that we see, however, exist only inside the camera as recorded onto a sheet of film. Consequently, the making and building up of each photograph is a labour-invested, happenstance operation. One consolation is that when the procedure fails, it can also often succeed: potential clues are revealed, alluding to another way of seeing, another way of thinking. As such, Eaton’s photographs may well reveal just how limited our ability to perceive the world still is.